Search results for 'electronic+disturbance'



person

Brett Stalbaum

Brett Stalbaum is an artist and research theorist specializing in information theory, database, and software development. A serial collaborator, he was a co-founder of the Electronic Disturbance Theater in 1998, for which he co-developed software called FloodNet (http://www.thing.net/~rdom/ecd/ecd.html), which has been used on behalf of the Zapatista movement against the websites of the Presidents of Mexico and the United States, as well as the Pentagon. As Forbes Magazine put it "Perhaps the first electronic attack against a target on American soil was the result of an art project." For EDT, this was all learned behavior taught by the example of the Zapatistas. Stalbaum has been part of many other individual and collaborative projects, and has published widely on digital art, its context and aesthetics, and location aware media. He is a past editor of Switch, the new media journal of the CADRE digital media lab.

Read


    file

    Sustenance: Trans Borders Play

      Sustenance.pdf, 756,2 KiB
    Sustenance: A Play for All Trans [ ] Borders by Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab www.thing.net/~rdom/Sustenance.pdf Published  by Printed Matter Inc. , as part of its Artist & Activist pamphlet series. Text by Electronic Disturbance Theater/b.a.n.g. lab [ http://bang.calit2.net/xborder ]: Amy Sara Carroll, Ricardo Dominguez, Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cárdenas, and Elle Mehrmand Play Directors: Amy Sara Carroll and Ricardo Dominguez Cultural Liaison: Chanda L. Carey Poems: Amy Sara Carroll German translation: Petra Kuppers Greek translation: Yanoula Athanassakis Taiwanese translations: Lili Hsieh/ and Zona Yi-Ping Tsou/ Our very best in all trans [  ] infinties to all of  you. Ricardo Dominguez http://bang.calit2.net

    article

    The Transborder Immigrant Tool: Violence, Solidarity and Hope in Post-NAFTA Circuits of Bodies Electr(on)/ic 

    This polyvocal, collectively authored paper describes the Transborder Immigrant Tool, a border disturbance art project developed by the Electronic Disturbance Theater. The paper outlines the motivations behind the tool and elaborates a notion of Science of the Oppressed as a methodology for developing locative media projects in solidarity with social movements. A shift is identified from Tactical Media to Tactical Biopolitics in contemporary media art. Walkingtools.net is also introduced as a platform for sharing technical information about locative media projects in order to create an ecology of projects. Poetic sustenance, part of the Transborder Immigrant Tool's functioning, is discussed in a context of Inter-American Transcendentalism.

    Read

    article

    Intro for Net. activism Forum 

    Ten years ago, there were few online activists and they believed that "cyberspace" was all theirs, a territory from which to emerge anywhere, outflanking the lumbering second-wave dinosaurs responsible for the Cold War and its successor, the McWorld. In the future that actually unfolded, the dinosaurs learned to boot up computers, connect to the Internet and post Web pages, or pay someone to do all this for them. What was a poor online activist to do? Even the son of Slobodan Milosevic has a Web site, to promote his Belgrade dance club.

    Read

    article

    The XYZ of Net Activism 

    It's time to create the pop stars of activism,
    the idoru of communication guerrilla,
    it's time to threaten and charm the
    masses by the ghosts coming from the
     net, to play the myth against the myth,
    to be more nihilist than infoteinment!
                                      - etoy -

    Read


    article

    When Thought Becomes Crime* 

    March 17th, 2005

    How did it come to this?

    Only a perverse authoritarian logic can explain how Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) can at one moment be creating the project "Free Range Grain" for the Risk exhibition at Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, reconfiguring it for The Interventionists exhibition at Mass MoCA in a second moment, and then suddenly have a CAE member in FBI detention.   The U.S. Justice Department has accused us of such shocking crimes as bioterrorism, health and safety violations, mail fraud, wire fraud, and even murder.   Now, as we retool "Free Range Grain" for the Risk exhibition at the Glasgow Center for Contemporary Art, the surreal farce of our legal nightmare continues unabated.

    Read

    article

    Electronic Civil Disobedience, Simulation, and the Public Sphere 

    What counts in the long run is the "use" one makes of a theory....We must start from existing practices in order to retrace the fundamental flaws.
    --Felix Guattari, "Why Marx and Freud No Longer Disturb Anyone"

    In 1994, when Critical Art Ensemble first introduced the idea and a possible model of electronic civil disobedience (ECD) as another option for digital resistance, the collective had no way of knowing what elements would be the most practical, nor did it know what elements would require additional explanation. After nearly five years of field testing of ECD by various groups and individuals, its information gaps have become a little more obvious and can finally be addressed.

    Read

    article

    Can Internet technology still revolutionize activism? 

    One of the biggest promises of the Internet was the transformation of political activism. No longer would change come about solely through the actions of large organizations, claimed the Web's early enthusiasts. Now, they claimed, individuals could rouse the concern of their fellow citizens for a particular cause through Web sites, e-mail, and online petitions. Those who normally shunned demonstrations and limited their participation in the public sphere could be contacted personally in their e-mail box, and all that would be necessary for them to do to show their support would be to click a button or fill in a field. Soon, pundits predicted, there would be a revolution in grassroots participation in the political process.

    Read

    campaign

    Critical Art Ensemble Defense Fund 

    The CAE Defense Fund was created in 2005 as a mechanism to raise funds for legal bills incurred by Dr. Steven Kurtz and Dr. Robert Ferrell in what its members argued was a politically motivated attack by the Department of Justice - one which threatened the constitutional and fundamental rights not only of the two defendants, but also of everyone, due to legal precedents that would have been set by an unfavorable outcome.

    In response, thousands of people worldwide organized demonstrations and raised money for the two men's legal defense through fundraisers and a variety of other grassroots efforts.

    www.caedefensefund.org

    Read

    article

    Bodies of Fear in a World of Threat 

    They wanted the Germs; they got 'em. - Darby Crash

    The use of the symbolic abstraction of fear as an exchangeable sign has always been a helpful means to justify and manifest the most perverse needs of authority invested in the expansion of militarized orders and the erasure of individual autonomy. But in the United States after the 9/11 attacks, fear reigns supreme as a fundamental unit of exchange across the entire political, economic, and military spectrum.

    Read

    article

    CAE: Framing Tactical Media 


    Anyone involved with "tactical media" (TM) before its famed christening in 1996 at the Next Five Minutes had to know that naming this cultural/political tendency was going to have some very negative repercussions. The naming was the first step in doing what TM feared the most°Xclaiming cultural territory doomed to house haunting archives. Once given an official title, so many nasty processes could begin - most significantly, the construction of historical narratives. So many narratives already exist explaining this ephemeral, immediate, specific, and deterritorialized process of cultural production that seemed so urgent to so many radical subjects in the early 90s.

    Read


    article

    Utopian Promises-Net Realities 

    The need for net criticism certainly is a matter of overwhelming urgency. While a number of critics have approached the new world of computerized communications with a healthy amount of skepticism, their message has been lost in the noise and spectacle of corporate hype-the unstoppable tidal wave of seduction has enveloped so many in its dynamic utopian beauty that little time for careful reflection is left. Indeed, a glimpse of a possibility for a better future may be contained in the new techno-apparatus, and perhaps it is best to acknowledge these possibilities here in the beginning, since Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) has no desire to take the position of the neoluddites who believe that the techno-apparatus should be rejected outright, if not destroyed. To be sure, computerized communications offer the possibility for the enhanced storage, retrieval, and exchange of information for those who have access to the necessary hardware, software, and technical skills. In turn, this increases the possibility for greater access to vital information, faster exchange of information, enhanced distribution of information, and cross cultural artistic and critical collaborations. The potential humanitarian benefits of electronic systems are undeniable; however, CAE questions whether the electronic apparatus is being used for these purposes in the representative case, much as we question the political policies which guide the net's development and accessibility.

    Read