Search results for 'act up'

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Tompkin Square Riot Memories 

What follows are personal accounts from various people who were present on that fateful night in Tompkins Square on August 6, 1988. They observed and experienced firsthand the bloodlust of the marauding cops invading our neighborhood from all over the city. Twenty years later, these memories are still fresh in the minds of those who were there, as though it all happened just yesterday....

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Streaming Networks 

We've had the camcorder revolution. It made making videoprograms cheaper. Audio-equipment is affordable, so radiomaking is possible for a large amount of people too. So for a long time already the masses are potential mediaproducers. There were only minor successes in accessing the broadcast channels both legally and illegally. But the efficient one-to-many distribution system (radio and tv) are chocked, regulated, hard to get access to. The Internet having the capacity for streaming media seems to promise new possibilities. Boundless access, for anyone making radio, and maybe in the near future TV. Some are pessimistic, and see these channels soon closed and regulated as well. What will this streaming media look like and who will be streaming?

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    Special "Merseyside editions" of The S*n appear in Liverpool newsagents: The Truth - We Lied 

    A spoof edition of The S*n tabloid newspaper has started to appear at Liverpool news agents, following the Sun's refusal to mention the Hillsborough inquest verdicts on its front page, and the infamous 'The Truth' front page on April 19, 1989, containing false accusations towards Liverpool fans. In parallel a nation wide campaign has started refusing free World Cup promotion editions of The Sun across the UK.

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    The Days of the Commune 

    a work in progress in solidarity with OWS -  live and online

    Citizens join us!
    Every Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 1.30pm, March through May, we come to Liberty Square (Zuccotti Park) to work on The Days of the Commune, a play by Bert Brecht. Each scene in the play denotes one day. Each day is documented and posted on our website thedaysofthecommune.com

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    The antidemocratic makeover of the cultural scene in Hungary 

    Recent legislative steps in Hungary point towards  the authoritarian transformation of the  institutional structures and funding system of  cultural life, by giving an ultra conservative  artist group close to the rightwing government,  the Hungarian Academy of Arts, an unassailable  position of power. As a result of these  decisions, the government has endangered the long  term autonomy, professionalism and democratic  procedures of Hungarian contemporary art.

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    Indymedia: It's time to move on 

    Indymedia is the name given to a particular network with a rather uneven global reach, to which many hundreds of local independent media projects, mostly web-based, have been affiliated at one time or another. It is also the name for a particular approach to news media - one that attempts to avoid hierarchal production and hence promote grassroots reports on events.

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     VakuumTV

    VakuumTV was founded in February 1994 on the initiative of László Kistamás. Its members presented weekly broadcasts on Monday nights at the most popular cultural club in Budapest, Tilos az Á.

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    Carbon Defense League

    Carbon Defense League (CDL) is a collective of media artists, technologists, activists and critical theorists working to explore the intersection between radical theory, traditional activism, and technology subversion through the creation of tactical media projects utilizing communication system technologies. The collective began in Pittsburgh, PA in 1997 and now has international membership with concentrations in areas including Michigan, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Spain, Australia, Amsterdam, and the United Kingdom.

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      Utopian Promises-Net Realities 

      The need for net criticism certainly is a matter of overwhelming urgency. While a number of critics have approached the new world of computerized communications with a healthy amount of skepticism, their message has been lost in the noise and spectacle of corporate hype-the unstoppable tidal wave of seduction has enveloped so many in its dynamic utopian beauty that little time for careful reflection is left. Indeed, a glimpse of a possibility for a better future may be contained in the new techno-apparatus, and perhaps it is best to acknowledge these possibilities here in the beginning, since Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) has no desire to take the position of the neoluddites who believe that the techno-apparatus should be rejected outright, if not destroyed. To be sure, computerized communications offer the possibility for the enhanced storage, retrieval, and exchange of information for those who have access to the necessary hardware, software, and technical skills. In turn, this increases the possibility for greater access to vital information, faster exchange of information, enhanced distribution of information, and cross cultural artistic and critical collaborations. The potential humanitarian benefits of electronic systems are undeniable; however, CAE questions whether the electronic apparatus is being used for these purposes in the representative case, much as we question the political policies which guide the net's development and accessibility.

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      Clean Clothes Campaign 

      The CCC is an international campaign, focused on improving working conditions in the global garment and sportswear industries, and empower the workers in it. There is a Clean Clothes Campaign in 12 European countries. These are Austria, Belgium (North and South), Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

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      Occupy Los Angeles

      Declaration of Occupation

      As we gather together in solidarity to express a feeling of mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. We write so that all people who feel wronged by the corporate forces of the world can know that we are your allies.

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      Justice for Cecily 

      Cecily McMillan was brutally arrested at an event marking the 6 month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street on March 17, 2012. In the course of her arrest she sustained a violent police beating resulting in bruised ribs and a seizure. Cecily was hospitalized for those injuries. The egregious incident received extensive media coverage. Cecily was later charged and convicted with felony assault of a police officer, Assault 2nd degree, a Class D felony in NY, which carries a sentence of up to 7 years in prison.
      A support campaign for the Occupy Wall Street organizer and activist is raising media attention and financial support.

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      We are not surprised. 

      We are not surprised.

      We are artists, arts administrators, assistants, curators, directors, editors, educators, gallerists, interns, scholars, students, writers, and more—workers of the art world—and we have been groped, undermined, harassed, infantilized, scorned, threatened, and intimidated by those in positions of power who control access to resources and opportunities. We have held our tongues, threatened by power wielded over us and promises of institutional access and career advancement.

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      Stranded 

      When thinking about dead bodies on the beach, these days most people think of refugees whose boats sank during the dangerous sea crossing to the European Union. The number of refugees drowned in the Mediterranean Sea in 2015 is the highest ever, reaching 2,500. The killing of these men and women can effectively be seen as a direct – and deliberate – act of EU policy, making the border between Northern Africa and Europe the deadliest in the world.

      The photographic series "Stranded" shows men lying motionless on an empty beach. But unlike refugees these men wear business suits, the standardized clothing of politicians and managers. Their bodies are partly in the water, partly on the beach; they appear to be stranded.

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