Search results for 'free+software'

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Adam Hyde

Adam Hyde is a sound and radio artist from New Zealand, and CEO of Floss Manuals - Free Manuals for Free Software.
He is the co-founder with Honro Harger of r a d i o q u a l i a sound and media art collective.

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Patrice Riemens

Patrice Riemens (born 1950) is a geographer and currently the Fellow of the Waag Society in Amsterdam. He is a promoter of Open Knowledge and Free Software, and has been involved as a "FLOSSopher" (a 'philosopher' of the Free/Libre and Open Source Software movements) at the Asia Source and Africa Source camps, held in 2005 and 2006 to promote FLOSS among non-governmental organisations. He is a member of the staff of Multitudes.

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    Aaron Swartz

    Aaron Swartz is the founder of Demand Progress, which launched the campaign against the Internet censorship bills (SOPA/PIPA) and now has over a million members. He is also a Contributing Editor to The Baffler and on the Council of Advisors to The Rules.

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    Volker Grassmuck

    Media sociologist and author. Currently he is a visiting reasearcher at the Research Group on Public Policy for Access to Information (GPOPAI) at the School for Arts, Sciences and Humanities (EACH) of the University of São Paulo. He was project lead of the conference series Wizards-of-OS.org and of the copyright information portal iRights.info, co-founded mikro-berlin.org and privatkopie.net and has published among others: ?Freie Software zwischen Privat- und Gemeineigentum,? Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, Bonn 2002.

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    An Open Web Book Launched at Transmediale 2011 

    January 28, 2011 - Berlin - Today the book, An Open Web, is released for download and sale on the Web. Written in 5 days by 6 collaborators, An Open Web book sprint lead and Flossmanuals founder Adam Hyde said, "Zero to book in 5 days. It was an intensive process and loads of fun. The collaborators  met 9am Monday with no more text written than the title and 5 days later published the book."

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    Notes on the Politics of Software Culture 

    Software has, over the last few years, increasingly come into view as a cultural technique whose social and political impact ought to be studied carefully. To the extent that social processes rely on software for their execution - from systems of e-government and net-based education, online banking and shopping, to the organisation of social groups and movements -, it is necessary to understand the procedural specificities of the computer programmes employed, and the cultural and political 'rules' coded into them.

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      Tactical Media in Brazil - Submidialogia conference report 

      The four-day conference on the campus of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp) brought together many key persons from the tactical media movement of Brazil and some of their counterparts in the Brasilian government.
      The movement is converging from roots in free radio, free software, hardware hacking, art and social movements. It is currently focussed around a large-scale project master-minded by Claudio Prado and supported by the Ministry of Culture: ?Pontos de Cultura? (Culture Spots) which is aiming to empower up to 600 cultural projects with free software-based multimedia production and publication facilities.

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      make world paper 2 

      The World Social Forum, organized twice in Porto Alegre 2001 and 2002, not only prompted a flurry of autonomous self-organization, crossborder organization, and creative media interventions. It also initiated an intense process of analysis and reflection on the tricky question of a 'global' dynamic of self-organization.

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      make world paper 3 

      Two years after 911 the global cup looks both half full and half empty. It's hard to be optimistic, yet there are plenty of reasons for it. With the Bush-Blair war machine running out of steam, the movement of movements shifts its attention to alternatives for the WTO, Security Council and similar post-democratic bodies. In the moral desert of the Iraq War the structuration of imaginary consent through the repetitive bombardment of the image began to show severe cracks in credibility. These discrepancies within the represented result in a heightened need for action. The Iraq war didn't fool any one and both sides are still reeling a little from the shock. While maintaining their anger, people moved on from protest to a collective search for that other, possible world. What might a global democracy look like? Would it be a system with representatives and 'rights,' or rather a dynamic set of events, without higher aims?

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      Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto 

      In memoriam: Aaron Swartz

      Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. The world's entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of private corporations. Want to read the papers featuring the most famous results of the sciences? You'll need to send enormous amounts to publishers like Reed Elsevier.

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